Five Things

The weather this weekend was so nice that men over sixty were wearing winter jackets, people under 40 were wearing jeans and a light jacket, and kids were wearing as little as their parents allowed. As one would expect, the family and I managed to spend a good bit of the daylight hours outside. While the boy was not always happy with what was going on at any particular moment, he did greatly enjoy playing in the 7-Eleven-sized sandbox at a park not too far away. Lots of pictures were taken, and I even managed to get some great shots thanks to the fast shutter speed of the Canon DSLR. The summer humidity is not far off, so we're trying to enjoy as much time outside as we can beforehand.

Weather report aside, it's time for another list of things that don't necessarily warrant a blog post. First up …

The $300 CD

There used to be a popular music store in Ontario called Sam the Record Man that would often import albums from around the world. In the fall of 2000, Hamasaki Ayumi's 3rd studio album Duty was released to much fanfare, and I wanted a real copy, not just the decent-quality MP3s from Napster. So on the week of the release I called ahead to confirm the store had stock of the CD and asked that one be set aside for me, and I would be up on Saturday morning. On Friday I rented a car from the nearby Budget and invited a friend to join me on the 2-hour drive from Hamilton to Toronto to pick up a CD from Japan.

Young people have so much time on their hands.

The drive up was probably uneventful as I don't remember much about it. When we arrived at the music shop I went up to the counter and asked if they had my CD on hand. The clerk checked and, as one would expect when a young person calls a store asking that something be set aside, the CD was not waiting for me. Fortunately there were still two discs in stock and I picked up the coveted album for the insane price of $44.95 CAD, which was before the 15% tax was applied. Of course, as I had rented a car and drove for two hours just to get this CD, I didn't stop at just one Japanese import disc. I bought three: the aforementioned Duty album, a TM Revolution album, and a compilation from Neon Genesis Evangelion.

Not only was I young, foolish, and employed, I was stupid, too. All in all, the three discs came out to a little over $100, making the trip to Toronto come in at around $300 in total. Did I enjoy the drive? Absolutely. Did I enjoy the CD? Very much so, as I still listen to it today … on Spotify. Would I do something like this again? Probably not for music or some sort of collector's item.

Not the Target Audience

April is considered the start of the year in Japan for schools, TV shows, and a number of businesses that prefer fiscal years not follow calendar years. This year a number of shows that the boy likes to watch have seen regular cast members go and new people join. Animated shows such as Thomas and Friends has also started another season, with the voice actors the boy and I have come to know reprising their roles. There's just one problem: I strongly dislike the changes. Especially when it comes to Thomas and Friends.

The boy disagrees. He loves the changes. I haven't heard him laugh this much when watching his programs ever. Clearly I'm not the target audience, and that's fine. So long as the boy is happy, then my opinions on the matter are less than inconsequential.

Power Napping

In an effort to try and regain some semblance of sanity, I've decided to invest some time in power naps throughout the day. For the moment it's just five to ten minutes in the afternoon, but may try to squeeze in ten minutes after 4:00pm as well. With a slightly more rested mind, better things will happen … like being able to stay awake during meetings.

The Sound of Processing

Sleeping in the same room as the 10C server1 means I get to hear when the system is doing some heavier lifting. What's interesting is hearing the system and the hard drives work when it comes time to do the hourly and daily backups2. There's a certain rhythm to each backup and I've already worked out the sounds of a healthy backup.

I wonder if people who work at data centres also train their ears to catch anomalies.

Pre-Pre-Kindergarten

Tomorrow will be a big day for the boy as a nearby kindergarten opens its gates to neighbourhood children who will start attending school for half a day starting April 2020. There are three kindergartens in the area and we're not yet 100% certain which school would be best for him, so tomorrow's open house will be an interesting opportunity to see the facilities, the teachers, and how the boy reacts to everything. He's not particularly comfortable in areas with a whole lot of foot traffic, but kindergartens should be different given the size of the feet.

With just one week remaining before most of the country shuts down to celebrate the series of national holidays and the new emperor's coronation, it will be interesting to see how much work gets thrown my way. Given the amount of overtime that I've been clocking the last couple of weeks, I fully expect managers to start stepping in and asking that I do much, much less.

This is assuming, of course, that managers at the day job start to manage.


  1. My snoring is keeping people awake, so it's better if I sleep in a different room for the time being.

  2. The database is backed up hourly and the files are done daily. Spinning disks are used to store uploaded data while SSDs are used for the databases.

Five Things

After a frantic couple of days last week, I managed to carve out a two hour period this afternoon to just get out of the house, sit on a mountain, and listen to a podcast with my eyes closed. The forecasted rain was nowhere near as strong as predicted, making the isolation quite enjoyable1.

This next week is going to see me work on several important updates to four of my active projects, all of which are built on the same software powering this site. A little bit of me time was necessary, and it also gave me plenty to think about, including:

Planet Hoph

Planet Hopf

I just learned about this representation of the Hopf fibration today. I would have appreciated this 20 years ago when I studied differential topologies, as it would have saved a week or two of WTF? moments.

Thanatophobic?

Far too much of my time (on a human sale) is spent thinking about time on a grand scale and it’s implications. As of this moment, every living entity that we know of on the earth is equally mortal. Some may experience more seasons than others, but we will all return to the earth at some point. Earlier today when I was thinking about Nozomi’s eventual passing I was reminded that I’m not at all afraid of my eventual death, but that if others. When I die, that will be the end of me. I’ve done what I can to ensure family will be taken care of2. It might not be easy for some members of family, but there won’t be anything I can do about it. If others pass away before me, though, then they’re forever in my memory but forever gone. I’ve lived 40 years and only been to one funeral. Silly as it sounds, I am not at all sure how I will react when a close member of my family, be they human or otherwise, passes away. It really bothers me.

Not Appropriation

We can’t seem to go more than a dozen minutes without there being some group of people “voicing concerns” about cultural appropriation and how it’s detrimental to the uniqueness and vibrancy of cultures and civilizations. As an immigrant to Asia, I wonder how much of Japan’s culture I’ve appropriated and whether it’s a bad thing, given that I’m from Canada with dozens of generations of ancestry that hails from England, Ireland, and France.

I have a very Japanese work ethic, often resulting in warnings from family and colleagues about 過労死, which literally means “dying from overwork”. Is this cultural appropriation? Should I feel bad about myself?

I eat with chop sticks and generally stay away from silverware unless buttering toast or eating yogurt. Is this cultural appropriation? Should I feel bad about myself?

I speak, read, and write Japanese to a certain degree. Enough to buy a house and live day to day in the country, anyway. Language is very much a part of culture, so have I appropriated it from native-born Japanese people and sullied it for my own gains? Is this appropriation and should I feel bad about myself?

Or is the entire “cultural appropriation” argument just a straw man for something much deeper that people are unaware of or unable to adequately articulate?

I’ve lived a very Japanese life for much longer than I’ve lived in this country. Ever since I read about the country in the Collier’s Encyclopedia set my father bought when I was young the nation, it’s people, it’s history, and it’s culture have been absolutely fascinating to me. So much so that I boldly said to my parents at the age of 14 that I would live in Japan one day. And here I am. Have I appropriated the culture? No. I have assimilated it and, by doing so, have an appreciation for a lot of what’s been learned. I emulate the parts of the culture that align with my existing beliefs, and I avoid the things I have no interest in.

People have been doing this since before we left the trees. Cultures evolve and borrow from one another. Most of the appropriation arguments that I’ve read, admittedly on left-leaning websites, seem to believe that cultures should operate in complete isolation and be practised only by those with a genetic link to its history, which is pretty much impossible and a recipe for disaster3.

Rain on the Window

Last Friday marked one year since the family moved into our new house, and it’s been quite a step up from our previous living arrangements. One of the more interesting things that I’ve enjoyed about living in this house is the sound of the weather as it hits the exterior walls and windows. Regardless of how windy the day is, it sounds as though a gentle breeze is caressing the siding. Heavy rains sound like the gentle refilling of a modern toilet: water that’s running, but in no hurry.

It’s lovely to just sit back and listen to the house … when the boy is sleeping and background noise is eliminated.

6:15am

This seems to be the new time for the boy to wake up and instantly start talking. If I wasn’t consistently working until 1-to-2 o’clock in the morning, then this wouldn’t be a problem. Unfortunately running on just four hours of sleep a day catches up to a person. How do parents of multiple children manage to work and sleep? Is it a myth that parents get any sleep at all?


  1. The mountain I enjoy sitting on is in the middle of a park. When it rains, the whole area is pretty much deserted aside from a few stragglers like me who just want to enjoy the quiet. There are covered gazebos at various points as well, which makes sitting in the rain possible, so long as it’s not a “Vancouver drizzle”, as the only protection from that is not going outside at all.

  2. In the event of a natural death the mortgage will be paid off, Reiko will receive $150K in cash plus the cost of any funeral, and the boy will get $75K. In the event of an accidental death, the insurance payouts are tripled.

  3. Cultures (and languages) that don’t evolve tend to disappear.

Five Things

Yesterday the family and I enjoyed a picnic at a popular park in Nagoya, travelling 55 minutes each way. As one would expect during cherry blossom season, there were thousands of people in attendance making all kinds of noise and generally enjoying themselves. Despite the splitting headache and momentary anxiety rush, the trip was a complete success. Everyone enjoyed the time together.

This morning Reiko learned that a children’s theme park not too far from here was going to have a show featuring ワンワン1, one of the boy’s favourite TV characters. Throwing caution to the wind with a second consecutive day out in a sea of humanity, we quickly got ready and drove to 犬山市2. The weather was gorgeous, though a little hot at times when the 27°C temperatures felt more like 37°C. That said, it wasn’t too bad, which made standing in line to see the show a little more bearable.

Waiting in Line at Japan Monkey Park

Today’s adventure turned out to be better than yesterday’s, though the boy was clearly in need of a nap at certain points this afternoon. One observation I had today while watching other parents try to coral and herd their children is that adults tend to have a bit more fun at these sorts of events than the kids … which is both relieving and weird.

Preamble aside, it’s time to get on with the list!

Bare Bums

A lot of parents seem to have no qualms with changing their child’s diaper in plain view when there are potentially dozens or hundreds of spectators. Regardless of how often I see a parent quickly go through the well-practiced motions of changing a dirty diaper in public, I still find it a bit odd given how such things are strongly frowned upon in Canada.

Muscle Mass

Over the last two years my arms have gotten much stronger. There was a time when I thought that, after carrying her for a kilometre or two, Nozomi was a heavy puppy. She’s been consistently around 4.5Kg since 2013. Today I was carrying the boy in one arm, his stroller with various drinks and whatnot, and a bag with other necessary items while walking 700m from the parking lot to the park. Reiko estimated that this was about 20Kg in total, which I managed to do without dropping anything or stopping to rest.

Parents have to become strong if they are to succeed, it seems.

Shattered Screens

Something I observed a lot this weekend is the condition of people’s cell phones. It seemed that anyone with a child under the age of five had a phone with a shattered screen held together with a “screen protector” that was more a finger protector than anything else. While I can appreciate the advantages of using glass on a touch device, I do wonder why plastic is not a viable option for people to choose. Life happens and technology is subjected to a great deal of abuse. Colour matching is generally suboptimal with plastic screens but, given the number of people with shattered screens or visibility-blocking films on their glass devices, accurate colour rendering may not be as important as some manufacturers think.

Pervasive Pollen

Despite the heroic efforts of the allergy medicine, the incredible amount of pollen in the air has meant that I get to sneeze and cough just slightly less than I might if I weren’t relying on an antihistamine. Fortunately there are just seven months to go before the next winter season begins.

Silenced Sirens

It’s been a little more than a week since I’ve ditched a bunch of news sources for being undeniably biased in their reporting. This leaves just eight sources of news in my life, four of which are focused on technology. All in all, I’ve been quite happy with the change. While the lack of reading angry articles everyday will take some getting used to, this has proven incredibly good for the mind. Some echo chambers are harder to identify than others.

Tomorrow is the start to another workweek for a lot of people. Let’s make it a good one.


  1. ワンワン is read as “wan-wan”, which is equivalent to “woof-woof” in English.

  2. 犬山市 is read as “Inuyama-shi”, or “Inuyama City”. Fun fact, 犬 means “dog”, and 山 means “mountain”. We went to “dog mountain city” to see a person dressed in a dog costume named “woof-woof” … and Nozomi, a real dog, couldn’t join us.