Five Things

The weather this weekend was so nice that men over sixty were wearing winter jackets, people under 40 were wearing jeans and a light jacket, and kids were wearing as little as their parents allowed. As one would expect, the family and I managed to spend a good bit of the daylight hours outside. While the boy was not always happy with what was going on at any particular moment, he did greatly enjoy playing in the 7-Eleven-sized sandbox at a park not too far away. Lots of pictures were taken, and I even managed to get some great shots thanks to the fast shutter speed of the Canon DSLR. The summer humidity is not far off, so we're trying to enjoy as much time outside as we can beforehand.

Weather report aside, it's time for another list of things that don't necessarily warrant a blog post. First up …

The $300 CD

There used to be a popular music store in Ontario called Sam the Record Man that would often import albums from around the world. In the fall of 2000, Hamasaki Ayumi's 3rd studio album Duty was released to much fanfare, and I wanted a real copy, not just the decent-quality MP3s from Napster. So on the week of the release I called ahead to confirm the store had stock of the CD and asked that one be set aside for me, and I would be up on Saturday morning. On Friday I rented a car from the nearby Budget and invited a friend to join me on the 2-hour drive from Hamilton to Toronto to pick up a CD from Japan.

Young people have so much time on their hands.

The drive up was probably uneventful as I don't remember much about it. When we arrived at the music shop I went up to the counter and asked if they had my CD on hand. The clerk checked and, as one would expect when a young person calls a store asking that something be set aside, the CD was not waiting for me. Fortunately there were still two discs in stock and I picked up the coveted album for the insane price of $44.95 CAD, which was before the 15% tax was applied. Of course, as I had rented a car and drove for two hours just to get this CD, I didn't stop at just one Japanese import disc. I bought three: the aforementioned Duty album, a TM Revolution album, and a compilation from Neon Genesis Evangelion.

Not only was I young, foolish, and employed, I was stupid, too. All in all, the three discs came out to a little over $100, making the trip to Toronto come in at around $300 in total. Did I enjoy the drive? Absolutely. Did I enjoy the CD? Very much so, as I still listen to it today … on Spotify. Would I do something like this again? Probably not for music or some sort of collector's item.

Not the Target Audience

April is considered the start of the year in Japan for schools, TV shows, and a number of businesses that prefer fiscal years not follow calendar years. This year a number of shows that the boy likes to watch have seen regular cast members go and new people join. Animated shows such as Thomas and Friends has also started another season, with the voice actors the boy and I have come to know reprising their roles. There's just one problem: I strongly dislike the changes. Especially when it comes to Thomas and Friends.

The boy disagrees. He loves the changes. I haven't heard him laugh this much when watching his programs ever. Clearly I'm not the target audience, and that's fine. So long as the boy is happy, then my opinions on the matter are less than inconsequential.

Power Napping

In an effort to try and regain some semblance of sanity, I've decided to invest some time in power naps throughout the day. For the moment it's just five to ten minutes in the afternoon, but may try to squeeze in ten minutes after 4:00pm as well. With a slightly more rested mind, better things will happen … like being able to stay awake during meetings.

The Sound of Processing

Sleeping in the same room as the 10C server1 means I get to hear when the system is doing some heavier lifting. What's interesting is hearing the system and the hard drives work when it comes time to do the hourly and daily backups2. There's a certain rhythm to each backup and I've already worked out the sounds of a healthy backup.

I wonder if people who work at data centres also train their ears to catch anomalies.

Pre-Pre-Kindergarten

Tomorrow will be a big day for the boy as a nearby kindergarten opens its gates to neighbourhood children who will start attending school for half a day starting April 2020. There are three kindergartens in the area and we're not yet 100% certain which school would be best for him, so tomorrow's open house will be an interesting opportunity to see the facilities, the teachers, and how the boy reacts to everything. He's not particularly comfortable in areas with a whole lot of foot traffic, but kindergartens should be different given the size of the feet.

With just one week remaining before most of the country shuts down to celebrate the series of national holidays and the new emperor's coronation, it will be interesting to see how much work gets thrown my way. Given the amount of overtime that I've been clocking the last couple of weeks, I fully expect managers to start stepping in and asking that I do much, much less.

This is assuming, of course, that managers at the day job start to manage.


  1. My snoring is keeping people awake, so it's better if I sleep in a different room for the time being.

  2. The database is backed up hourly and the files are done daily. Spinning disks are used to store uploaded data while SSDs are used for the databases.

Topics

Earlier this evening, while Nozomi and I were out for an after-dinner walk, I was thinking about some of the things I might write about today. As with most days, there were a number of topics that I could write about, but only enough time to focus on one. To make matters more complicated, the subject couldn't be too complicated, otherwise any attempt to write intelligently on the subject would be ruined by my inability to remain consistently conscious when sitting down1, which is exacerbated further if sitting on my bed. So with all of this in mind, what could I possibly choose to write about today to put the bow on another week?

One of the more interesting challenges that I've started running into when planning the day's article is writing about something different from the 2,800+ other posts on this site. With over a decade worth of writing published on this site, choosing something that is relatively untouched is by no means easy. I'll admit that there are a number of recurring themes that pop up from time to time, either involving the boy, the day job, or my mental state, but I do try to write about something different whenever possible. This isn't so much for the benefit of people reading the blog, but more for the enjoyment of writing.

Today's possible topics involved the monthly Windows Magazine that I used to collect and look forward to every month as a teen, sleeping in a room with a server, the challenges of taking good pictures of children or puppies, and the purpose of desktop backgrounds on machines where you almost always fun applications full screen. All of these are worthwhile, but only one can be chosen. As you have probably guessed, the topic I went with for today was "blogging about topics".

For the first few years of blogging, I would often make a quick text note with my HP iPaq, then write the post one stroke at a time on the train ride home. With every day involving at least 140 minutes of train time, it seemed logical to use the time to write. Being alone for over two hours of every day is now a luxury that I sorely miss, so writing is generally started on the phone with some poorly-typed notes while walking the puppy, then completed on a device with a physical keyboard.

Not a day goes by where I don't think about how to improve the way I write posts, and not a day goes by where I don't think about writing better as a whole. The latter requires practice and focus while the former is something I don't have an answer for. Having the preliminary notes written before the blog post itself generally seems like a good way to let the mind think about a subject for a while before there is time to write. Using mind maps and other writing tools would certainly lead to better posts, but these things often require a pretty large time commitment, which is something that I cannot negotiate with the family when people require attention. Speech to text doesn't seem right, either, as it would mean talking to a computer and thinking less about the words that get put on the screen.

What I would like, however, is a small application that would keep track of the blog ideas I jotted down for a given day and hide them around 3:00am so that the next day would start with a blank page. Throughout the day, I'd want to go back to the application and maybe jot a note down or add a link to a picture. When the time comes to actually write at the end of the day, I could then look at the application and all the disparate notes that were written throughout the day would be loosely attached to a topic thread and I could write from there. This would be similar to a mind map, but slightly less structured.

I would write something like this myself if I had the time. Naturally, it would also fully support publishing items directly to 10C. Unfortunately there just isn't enough time in the day, so I'll continue to think about how to improve my writing while doing the writing.


  1. This will probably be a topic for another day.

Worn Out

Over the last couple of years there has been a recurring theme on this site where I write about a lack of sleep either due to a persistent bout of insomnia or just a larger-than-is-manageable workload. In every post I refer to my age and how a little power nap with lunch1 isn't enough to recharge if fewer than four hours of sleep is obtained. Generally I'll make some efforts to get to bed before midnight on the Friday and hope like heck the boy doesn't wake before sunrise so that the weekend isn't a blur … but this doesn't seem to be enough anymore. The candle has been burning at both ends for months, and I'm just absolutely worn out.

Like a Lit Match

In just one week the Japanese holiday period dubbed Golden Week begins, which will mean that for ten days I will (ideally) not be doing anything related to the day job. Reiko and I have been making some general plans to bring the boy to some special events and parks, and we'll also be meeting her parents to enjoy a nice dinner at a nice restaurant to mark 12 years of marriage. If that wasn't enough to have happen in one week, the news cycle will be jumping between stories on the over-capacity bullet trains ferrying people around the country and the coronation of Japan's next emperor. During this time I'll be working on a number of items related to 10C, but I'll also be starting a new project that I hope will be seen as a positive step forward in my goal to be fully self-employed in 2022.

When I set my mind on a goal, I tend to work incredibly hard to make it happen. Unfortunately, when working for someone else, there will always be multiple goals that need to be completed, often with conflicting or near-simultaneous deadlines. This makes it easy to get stuck in one of those vicious cycles where the more you work, the more work you have to do.

Last month I worked the equivalent of 6.5 40-hour weeks for the day job, plus 10C, plus being away from the computer to spend time with the family. It's simply unsustainable. What I need to do is become more like the match above, being lit at just one end2. 2022 is not that far away, and I'm not at all keen on being with my employer for much longer3.


  1. I used to do this while in Canada. A quick, 15-minute power nap at the office after the colleagues went out for lunch but before they came back was an excellent way to recharge, especially if there were going to be meetings in the afternoon.

  2. I certainly see the possible error of working during a vacation period, but this would be more for personal development than the day job. It would be "fun" … so that makes it okay, right?

  3. I'm not interested in working for most other companies, either. The time has come to be independent … again.

Cognitive Kaizen

A little over ten years ago I wrote this blog post on trans-gendered people in Japan and the darn thing has remained one of the most popular posts found on any of my sites. As of this morning it has been accessed 477,218 times, which is more than triple it's nearest competitor. By all accounts, I should be happy that something from a decade ago is still being read today. Unfortunately, I'm anything but. The post is awful on a number of levels. From the grammar to the stupid "score out of 10", the article is a shining example of my ignorance on the topic back at the start of 2009.

This isn't a virtue signalling1 post.

Very few of the posts I've written since 2006 have been deleted or otherwise taken down, even when I was proven wrong or justifiably castigated for some of the stupid things that were said. A lot of this has to do with the reality that whatever is put online is there "forever", which is particularly true for websites where Archive.org's Way Back Machine stops by every couple of days to see what's new. But it's not just the web crawlers that keep me from removing old posts, it's the personal context.

Regardless the subject, most people are pretty ignorant about things when they're young and slowly accumulate knowledge and life experiences that can fill the gaps in a person's understanding. I'm not particularly bright today, but I know that the person I am right now is much more aware of the world than the person I was a decade ago. The person I will become over the next 120 months will likely look back on items written today and wonder how such nonsensical drivel could have been pushed out on a daily basis. A million monkeys using a million typewriters could pound out better prose than this single fool at a keyboard. But this is the point of the exercise. If I were to go back over the thousands of blog posts published to this site over the years and revise or remove items, then I am ultimately erasing one of the better resources I have to go back and see how my thinking has evolved over time as a result of new information and new experiences. So while I may not like some posts very much, I would rather keep them online2 than lose them entirely.

Would I consider rewriting the older posts, linking back to the original so that it would be easier to show what sort of cognitive evolution has taken place? It's certainly an option. If I were to write another blog post about Haruna Ai, Ikko, or trans-gendered people in general, it would likely be a better researched, academic-style thesis on the complexities people face when trying to fit into the binary Male/Female labels that many cultures and societies enforce. Why write about something that has nothing to do with me? The reasoning is really quite simple. By writing about a topic, I need to slow down and be more deliberate with my thinking.

Quite often it's when I am writing about a topic I don't know very much about that I learn the most.


  1. Wikipedia defines virtue signalling as a pejorative for the conspicuous expression of moral values. Academically, the phrase relates to signalling theory to describe a subset of social behaviours that could be used to signal virtue—especially piety among the religious.

  2. Yes, I know that I can password protect or otherwise hide posts on my blogging platform. This still doesn't guarantee that posts can't be surfaced through Google cache queries or on The Way Back machine. It's better to keep the posts open for anyone to see what a fool I was, and how I'm (hopefully) less foolish today.

Documentation

In order for any bit of complex software to be better understood and effectively utilized, documentation must be made available to the people who will use the tool. Unfortunately, documentation is the least favourite task that faces every developer. I can count on one hand the number of full-time software people I know who actually enjoy putting the code editors away to instead write complete sentences. There are automation tools out there that will try to write the documentation for you, but these can only go so far. At the end of the day, the best author is going to be someone — or a collection of someones — who have a good understanding of the system … which can certainly be a problem for tools that are created by one or two people.

At the day job I'm fortunate enough to be in a position where I get to make new software every couple of months. These are tools that don't exist one day, then spring into existence 20 minutes after a meeting that sanctions their creation comes to an end. A lot of the tools start out small with just three or four functions that are relatively intuitive to anyone who has worked for my employer a couple of months. However, as people begin to use the simple system and ask for "just one more thing", the software becomes more complex. The rules become more opaque. The emails from people asking how to do something becomes unworkable. By this point, documentation is not only needed, but late.

Near the end of last year I was given the opportunity to create a piece of software that would be used by colleagues all over the world and integrate with our HR systems. After a couple of discussions with the project owners it became clear that documentation was something that couldn't wait until later, it needed to be part of the development cycle1. The HR department wanted a Word file that could be updated easily and sent out as a PDF to everyone who used the system. I balked at the idea and suggested that documentation be built right into the application, complete with screenshots, videos, and links to the pages being discussed. The management wasn't keen on the solution initially, but they quickly saw the benefit once the feedback started coming in. People were actually reading the documentation that was going up, and they thanked the HR managers for making it happen so quickly.

Score one for preparedness.

In addition to this documentation, though, is the developer documentation. This is generally something that doesn't get seen by people but, because this HR project is owned by HR, some key people have access to the GitHub repository where the source is kept. These people have been reading the commit messages, Wiki pages, and Issues, and they're quite impressed with the level of detail that goes into the internal docs.

Writing a great deal on GitHub is nothing new for me, as it's sometimes necessary to have a single place where the rules and reasoning behind certain design decisions are stored. To help future me, I try to include screen shots and lists of reasons for why some functions or classes were created the way they were. If something is particularly complicated, then the messages in the commits will be a little more colourful than the dry words found in the Wiki or supporting Markdown files. This is something I try to do with all of my applications, as most of them start out small and simple, then quickly start battling scope creep as more functionality is built in. There's just one problem, though: there's almost nothing (documentation-wise) for 10Cv5 in GitHub.

The vast majority of the notes for v5 have been written to A5-sized notepads and I'm not yet 100% sure how this information will get shared with the world in a readable format? Scanning with OCR could work to a certain degree, but these notes are not always written with complete sentences (or grammar) in mind.

Documentation for v5 is slowly being released with more going out every few days. Regardless of how many people use the system, having it documented will make it easier for anyone to understand how and why it does what it does. Had I been a little more proactive with the v5 documentation like I have been with the day-job projects, then there would likely be less missing from the platform2. Fortunately there is still time to remedy this issue.


  1. Generally this is the rule for larger organisations.

  2. One interesting thing that I have noticed is that by writing documentation for the system, I get to revisit the core functionality with a semi-fresh mind. If something doesn't make sense when I'm trying to write it down, then that's a pretty good indication that something can be improved.

Boutique Performance

Not a week goes by where a colleague doesn't complain to me about how slow or sluggish some system or piece of software is. More often than not it's the corporate-mandated tools that are being derided for their sub-optimal use of time and resources, but various websites are also starting to get mentioned more often. Sometimes people ask me how they could make these systems faster, whether it's a problem of not enough memory or CPU power, or why managers consistently choose the slowest software while demanding the fastest employees. There's no answer for the last one. The other two, however, share the same response: it depends.

There's no simple solution to improve the performance of software and any attempt to write about possible things to look for and check would be woefully incomplete1. Instead what I tend to do is nod in agreement and ask a couple of probing questions.

What are you trying to do?

This is always the first question, as most of my colleagues are generally trying to accomplish a relatively common task. My employer isn't trying to launch objects into orbit of far-away planets, cure cancer, or model climate change. We're an education company that has for decades subsisted on a combination of Excel sheets and sheer luck2.

How are you trying to solve this problem?

A lot of times when a person has a software problem, it's because they're doing something "the hard way" and can be taught an alternative method of performing the task3. So by better understanding how a person is approaching the problem, the myriad of options that might be available to solve a problem can be whittled down until there are just one or two good options to consider.

Is this a common task?

Common tasks should be programmatically solved. The role of a person is to be the brain and/or heart of an organisation. The role of a computer is to support that person so they can be as awesome as they want to be4.

Have you considered using ________?

This is the question that I generally try to get to if it's possible because I've found that a lot of the more common software tools that people use on a day-to-day basis are big, bloated, and don't always solve the problems a person might have. Some examples of this would be colleagues who have complained about how sluggish Evernote or OneNote has become after their 10,000th note. I can remember two instances where people did not want to use Word anymore because their computers would crash if both Outlook and Word were open at the same time5. Most people have probably had conversations like this at least once in the last year and it's a great opportunity to recommend tools from small and independent software developers who make a living by providing "boutique solutions".

I enjoy recommending tools like Sublime Text, Typora, Coda 2, Sequel Pro, and Mars Edit to people who need to scratch a specific itch6. It's even better when someone tells me they've bought a license for the software, meaning that the small developer — be they a studio or an independent — earned a little bit for their efforts. This is how software should be made.

There are a lot of reasons for why software might be written by a large team of people. Yet as the world becomes ever more complex, I find it's the smaller software shops that put out the better tools that can help us navigate this complexity with relative ease. Sublime and Typora have both saved me an incredible amount of time by being able to handle large files, or crazy-long line lengths, or just running with such a tiny memory footprint that the commercial memory hogs that run alongside these tools are not at all impacted. One of the many things that I hope to see in the future is a little bit of a return to software practices of old, where the goals are not just about completing the task at hand, but doing so with the most responsible use of resources possible. Applications that make genuine use of multiple CPU cores, reasonable amounts of memory, and simple UI language will always be in demand. So long as the people who make that software can get paid for doing so, there will always be a healthy number of creative problem solvers.


  1. When it comes to tracking down performance issues, sometimes an entire day (or more) needs to be invested to determine exactly what the problem is and what options exist going forward. A person can't simply blame a single component in the hardware or the software as applications are rarely "simple".

  2. This is a slight exaggeration, of course. There are a number of mission-critical systems that use SQL Server and Oracle databases, and our online infrastructure is staggeringly complex to support online lessons across the globe.

  3. The number of lives I've changed over the years after teaching someone how to use a pivot table or VLOOKUP or just Ctrl+D in Excel is by no means inconsequential.

  4. Some people don't want to be awesome at their job, and that's fine. There is still no reason for why someone wouldn't want a computer to do a repetitive task on their behalf (so long as it does not put them out of work).

  5. This turned out to be the result of a domain policy change pushed out by the IT department without anyone's knowledge. Yay, IT!

  6. Yes, I understand that most of these are for macOS. I talk to a lot of people who use Macs. I don't know many people personally who live in the Linux world like I do. Mind you, I will suggest switching to Ubuntu from time to time if someone is complaining about Windows or macOS.

Missing Chronology

Last month when someone wanted to find a specific post on my blog they would open the archives page, type in a few keywords, and let the incomplete search mechanism try to find the item they were looking for. If that didn't work, then clearing the filters and scrolling down would show every post in reverse chronological order going all the way back to April 1979. The default blogging theme on v5 works a little differently in that the search box is available on every page and, unlike the previous mechanism, will actually result in a database search. As people had a way to find items on a site, it never crossed my mind to build a page showing a site's table of contents until Larry reminded me.

Whoops.

Fortunately, building a page like this isn't incredibly complicated. The fact that the archives page does not need a search box also means it's possible to change how the page displays information. But how could the information be changed to show things that people might want to see? I thought about this question a bit this weekend and came up with this:

The Anri Archives Page

There were a couple of things that I liked about the previous design:

  1. posts were numered
  2. posts were grouped by month, with the month being a title
  3. grouping was done based on the time zone of the reader, not the author

These three features needed to be brought forward with the understanding that Bookmarks and Quotations would also appear on the archives page. Social posts, called notes, are not visible in the archives as this would be noise. Should there be a need to see all social posts in reverse chronological order, there is always the Notes page.

The previous version of 10C generally cheated with the archives page by presenting a blank page, querying the API for a list of posts with supporting meta data, then building the results. This works in most situations, but can cause some headaches for search engines that do not parse JavaScript or for people using a browser with JavaScript disabled. To help resolve this, archives are now presented in plain HTML and then modified after the fact.

One item I'm not too sure about at this point is the numbering. As the screen capture will show, the numbers count differently based on the kind of object. Articles, bookmarks, and quotations are all shown with an icon unique to their type, and the counter is for that type as well. Does this make sense? Does it matter whether these are split apart at all? Could everything have the same icon, or none at all, with the understanding that clicking the title will bring you to the author's page regardless of the type? I'm not 100% sure. Fortunately, the community on 10C will let me know when something doesn't quite work or needs improvement.

The archive theme was deployed with release 19D150 which is live on the server now. Every site with at least one article, bookmark, or quotation will see the "Archives" link in their navigation menu.

Five Things

After a frantic couple of days last week, I managed to carve out a two hour period this afternoon to just get out of the house, sit on a mountain, and listen to a podcast with my eyes closed. The forecasted rain was nowhere near as strong as predicted, making the isolation quite enjoyable1.

This next week is going to see me work on several important updates to four of my active projects, all of which are built on the same software powering this site. A little bit of me time was necessary, and it also gave me plenty to think about, including:

Planet Hoph

Planet Hopf

I just learned about this representation of the Hopf fibration today. I would have appreciated this 20 years ago when I studied differential topologies, as it would have saved a week or two of WTF? moments.

Thanatophobic?

Far too much of my time (on a human sale) is spent thinking about time on a grand scale and it’s implications. As of this moment, every living entity that we know of on the earth is equally mortal. Some may experience more seasons than others, but we will all return to the earth at some point. Earlier today when I was thinking about Nozomi’s eventual passing I was reminded that I’m not at all afraid of my eventual death, but that if others. When I die, that will be the end of me. I’ve done what I can to ensure family will be taken care of2. It might not be easy for some members of family, but there won’t be anything I can do about it. If others pass away before me, though, then they’re forever in my memory but forever gone. I’ve lived 40 years and only been to one funeral. Silly as it sounds, I am not at all sure how I will react when a close member of my family, be they human or otherwise, passes away. It really bothers me.

Not Appropriation

We can’t seem to go more than a dozen minutes without there being some group of people “voicing concerns” about cultural appropriation and how it’s detrimental to the uniqueness and vibrancy of cultures and civilizations. As an immigrant to Asia, I wonder how much of Japan’s culture I’ve appropriated and whether it’s a bad thing, given that I’m from Canada with dozens of generations of ancestry that hails from England, Ireland, and France.

I have a very Japanese work ethic, often resulting in warnings from family and colleagues about 過労死, which literally means “dying from overwork”. Is this cultural appropriation? Should I feel bad about myself?

I eat with chop sticks and generally stay away from silverware unless buttering toast or eating yogurt. Is this cultural appropriation? Should I feel bad about myself?

I speak, read, and write Japanese to a certain degree. Enough to buy a house and live day to day in the country, anyway. Language is very much a part of culture, so have I appropriated it from native-born Japanese people and sullied it for my own gains? Is this appropriation and should I feel bad about myself?

Or is the entire “cultural appropriation” argument just a straw man for something much deeper that people are unaware of or unable to adequately articulate?

I’ve lived a very Japanese life for much longer than I’ve lived in this country. Ever since I read about the country in the Collier’s Encyclopedia set my father bought when I was young the nation, it’s people, it’s history, and it’s culture have been absolutely fascinating to me. So much so that I boldly said to my parents at the age of 14 that I would live in Japan one day. And here I am. Have I appropriated the culture? No. I have assimilated it and, by doing so, have an appreciation for a lot of what’s been learned. I emulate the parts of the culture that align with my existing beliefs, and I avoid the things I have no interest in.

People have been doing this since before we left the trees. Cultures evolve and borrow from one another. Most of the appropriation arguments that I’ve read, admittedly on left-leaning websites, seem to believe that cultures should operate in complete isolation and be practised only by those with a genetic link to its history, which is pretty much impossible and a recipe for disaster3.

Rain on the Window

Last Friday marked one year since the family moved into our new house, and it’s been quite a step up from our previous living arrangements. One of the more interesting things that I’ve enjoyed about living in this house is the sound of the weather as it hits the exterior walls and windows. Regardless of how windy the day is, it sounds as though a gentle breeze is caressing the siding. Heavy rains sound like the gentle refilling of a modern toilet: water that’s running, but in no hurry.

It’s lovely to just sit back and listen to the house … when the boy is sleeping and background noise is eliminated.

6:15am

This seems to be the new time for the boy to wake up and instantly start talking. If I wasn’t consistently working until 1-to-2 o’clock in the morning, then this wouldn’t be a problem. Unfortunately running on just four hours of sleep a day catches up to a person. How do parents of multiple children manage to work and sleep? Is it a myth that parents get any sleep at all?


  1. The mountain I enjoy sitting on is in the middle of a park. When it rains, the whole area is pretty much deserted aside from a few stragglers like me who just want to enjoy the quiet. There are covered gazebos at various points as well, which makes sitting in the rain possible, so long as it’s not a “Vancouver drizzle”, as the only protection from that is not going outside at all.

  2. In the event of a natural death the mortgage will be paid off, Reiko will receive $150K in cash plus the cost of any funeral, and the boy will get $75K. In the event of an accidental death, the insurance payouts are tripled.

  3. Cultures (and languages) that don’t evolve tend to disappear.

Gaps

For the better part of six months, I would keep two browser tabs open on my phone and notebooks for nice.social and beta.nice.social. The first site ran v4 of the platform while the beta ran v5. This was sub-optimal, but allowed for a good deal of testing to take place with the newer software in a realistic setting. Earlier this week when a server update took down the v4 service, the decision was made to move everyone and everything over to the new platform because I felt that it was ready despite a handful of incomplete items. As was to be expected, there were a whole lot more gaps in the tool than I had anticipated.

A good amount of time has been dedicated to migrating data and resolving reported bugs over the last three days and it has brought back memories of many other migrations I've done over the years for personal projects, client projects, and with several employers. When things go smoothly, it means that something is most probably wrong. When things are hectic, it means that something's wrong but the people reporting the issues give a darn. Crazy as it might sound, I generally prefer any sort of migration that is going to involve people who give a darn.

Some of the problems reported include missing posts, broken avatars, missing functions, and site routing issues. When something is reported, I write it to an ever-growing list of tasks, making sure to set aside the time to resolve the matter. If the missing or broken item is actively affecting people, then it gets pushed up closer near the top. As of this writing the critical items have been resolved1, and a half-dozen other issues remain. The ones that will be tackled next include:

  • change the font on the Anri blogging theme to a better sans serif font
  • resolve some of the reported CSS issues on the Anri theme
  • enable messages via the OpsBar[2. The OpsBar is the name of the bar that runs along the top of a 10C site when signed in.
  • return a JSON response for an object with a canonical URL when the HTTP header requests a JSON response
  • enable follow/block lists on the social site
  • complete password-protection handling in the Anri theme

There are also close to 1800 blog posts that still need to be brought over, and the podcasts need additional work to ensure all of the meta data is imported and sent properly in the syndication feeds. If all goes according to plan, all of the core items will be resolved on Monday or early Tuesday and then the focus can shift from "Identify and Repair" to "Converse and Extend".

If there's one thing I can take away from this experience, it's that I should really look at having data migrated daily in an automated fashion during the development phase. This would ensure that migration scripts were complete, meaning the actual migration would be done at the full speed of he server.


  1. If they weren't resolved, I wouldn't be blogging.

Catch

Every morning the boy and I head out for a walk around the neighbourhood, through some parks, and over some obstacles. The idea is to ensure he gets some fresh air and exercise, but also to explore some of the fun that the world can offer. Today I thought that "fun" might involve bringing a ball so that we could toss it back and forth. Despite his laughter and best efforts, the kid won't be drafted by any ball team anytime soon. I'd like this to be something we can work on together.

As one would expect from a two year old, the boy started to become distracted and wanted to explore some of the park on his own, particularly the various leaves and seeds that were littering the walkways. While he did this, I decided to throw our ball against the wall for a bit. It didn't take long for me to realize that my throwing arm is nowhere near what it used to be.

A Baseball Glove on the Field

It's amazing what a person discovers they miss after a while.

The last time I played baseball or even just catch was at some point in the late 90s. I think it might have been the summer of 1999, but it could have been '97 or '98 as that was when I played on a regional team. Fortunately there are no pictures of me from that time period, as they would undoubtedly look quite bizarre; a tall kid with an average build1 wearing a black Rawlings glove, standing next to 3rd base, and having the longest head of hair in the park. I played alright and occasionally injured people sliding into third with a "too-powerful" swipe of the glove, but one thing that I was quite good at was accurate throwing. So long as there wasn't a need for endurance, I could throw a ball from second base into the strike zone of a ready batter.

Sustained accuracy was hard, though. A couple of times I was asked to pitch and would never finish an inning before being pulled. Accuracy was possible only when there were longer rests between throws. Three to four minutes seemed to be the right amount of time, which is far too long if you're expected to pitch dozens of times per inning. Third base, however, was perfect. Close enough to the action to be engaged, with fast, accurate throws being required just a handful of times each inning.

But that was 20 years ago. Today, while throwing the ball against a wall just 10 meters in front of me, I was hard pressed to get within 10cm of a splotch of paint. Untrained muscles more accustomed to picking up dachshunds and young children ached as they were used differently. Arm fat shifted noticeably. It wasn't at all comfortable.

Fortunately there's still time to train. The boy is too young to realize just how poor my throws are and how out of shape I've become. With a little bit of practice I can relearn some of the muscle training and get back to making some accurate throws. Perhaps by the time the boy is ready to join a little-league team, I'll be ready to join a semi-organized team as well. Silly as it may sound, I'd really like to play ball again.


  1. an average build for the late 90s, which is about half the build of a typical teen today based on the pictures I receive from family.