Pseudo-Wireless

The easiest and most cost effective way to transfer energy or information from one place to another is through a wire. Wires are portable, relatively durable, and can usually sit in the back of a closet for years without deteriorating. Wires are also really good at getting tangled. Really, really good … and I've long since tired of the hassle.

Rule 8 in the upcoming 12 More Rules for Life is "Try to make one room in your house as beautiful as possible", which is something I've generally followed with my working space since I was a teenager. A wonderful working space allows for better creativity. There are fewer distractions. There are fewer nuisances. The definition of what constitutes beautiful has evolved over time, but the overarching goal has not. When my working space is clean, I feel at peace and can focus completely on what's in front of me.

Wires are not beautiful. Perhaps when I was in my 20s they were, as more wires generally meant more things connected to the computers. More things connected meant more potential. But the chaos that comes from dealing with the cables of copper and plastic is just infuriating. Zip ties help with the stationary lines that deliver power and transfer data to the development machines, but headphones, tablets, cameras, and phones all have their own requirements with cables that cannot be fixed to a place without cluttering up the visible side of a desk. It's annoying as heck and I plan on doing something about it.

If I am to make my working space better suited and more beautiful, then the wires will need to be managed better. This means that one of the development notebooks that runs all the time will be put into a closet, as it is generally used for data processing via Linux; something I am able to accomplish through a terminal connection. The camera charger will be moved to the upstairs bookshelf, which has a power outlet that has never been used in the 18 months we've lived here. The tablets are charged via lightning and micro-USB cables, so it makes sense to bring them upstairs to sit next to the home server. If a tablet needs to be recharged, it can be done overnight. I generally prep my hardware the day before use, so this isn't any extra work beyond walking up a flight of stairs. The phones are also easy, as the main phone is charged overnight next to my bed and the work phone, which uses USB-C, has a 15cm cable that can be hidden away behind the external monitor to charge the device overnight.

With this done, the only wires I'll need to regularly interact with are used by headphones and microphones. Perhaps at some point in the future a decent pair of wireless headphones will solve this particular problem.

Wires certainly have their uses, but I've grown tired of battling with them every time I try to get something done.