I Am I

This past weekend I’ve been exchanging emails with an activist1 who has taken offence to a number of blog posts on this very site. All in all, the emails have resulted in the following statistics: 4 messages from me totalling 6,317 words, and 6 messages from them totalling 297 words. Their final message was a polite “Just be glad you don’t live in Canada because you’d be swatted”.

This is to be expected, though, as a simple mind will resort to violence when words to adequately justify an ideology, opinion, or accusation fail to materialize.

The crux of the activists position was that, as a cisgendered Caucasian male, I should not be writing about anything that is not directly related to being a cisgendered Caucasian male. They took offence to some posts about Japanese working culture. They took offence to some posts about politically-charged topics. They even took offence to some posts about my house, saying that I used my privilege to own property, which is one of the dumbest fucking things anyone has said to me in quite some time2.

Doing a bit of research, I found this person has been attending McGill University for the last few years and, rather than apply their newly-honed skills in social psychology to the betterment of society, are so bored with their youth that it warrants visiting random blogs on the Internet and typing in all caps about why someone should be ashamed of themselves because, just like Hitler, they were born white. How terribly sad that this is the sort of activity that a university-educated person chooses to embark upon. Surely there are better things to do.

Interestingly, this twerp has given me a reason to reconsider my Canadian citizenship. Do I want to keep it? I’ve been in Japan long enough that I could begin the process of becoming a citizen here, which would grant me the luxury of being able to vote and surprise people when they see a Japanese passport. I continue to read a handful of Canadian news sites on a daily basis and do not recognize the country as the same place I grew up. Yes, there is media bias to account for, yet the country’s general vibe seems to be one of listless finger-pointing and public shaming. What’s left of the education system is a joke that I refuse to let my children experience. And the politically-charged atmosphere seems to have almost completely turned ideas into thought crimes.

Why in the world would I want to subject my family to such a hostile environment?

But maybe for them Canada would be much more welcoming. My wife is neither male nor Caucasian. My son, though male, looks more like his mother. It might just be me who would be unwelcome. If this is the case, there’s really no point in maintaining citizenship. What benefits do I enjoy as a Canadian in Japan aside from owning a .ca domain name? Having thought about it off and on over the last few years, I haven’t identified a single one.


  1. I know, I know. I said I wouldn’t do this anymore, but it’s hard to not respond to messages.

  2. If someone has a problem with me earning enough money to own a house in a country I wasn’t born in, yet claim to be pro-immigration, they need to seriously sit down and think about what it is they truly believe in, because it’s not what they think it is.