Cognitive Kaizen

A little over ten years ago I wrote this blog post on trans-gendered people in Japan and the darn thing has remained one of the most popular posts found on any of my sites. As of this morning it has been accessed 477,218 times, which is more than triple it's nearest competitor. By all accounts, I should be happy that something from a decade ago is still being read today. Unfortunately, I'm anything but. The post is awful on a number of levels. From the grammar to the stupid "score out of 10", the article is a shining example of my ignorance on the topic back at the start of 2009.

This isn't a virtue signalling1 post.

Very few of the posts I've written since 2006 have been deleted or otherwise taken down, even when I was proven wrong or justifiably castigated for some of the stupid things that were said. A lot of this has to do with the reality that whatever is put online is there "forever", which is particularly true for websites where Archive.org's Way Back Machine stops by every couple of days to see what's new. But it's not just the web crawlers that keep me from removing old posts, it's the personal context.

Regardless the subject, most people are pretty ignorant about things when they're young and slowly accumulate knowledge and life experiences that can fill the gaps in a person's understanding. I'm not particularly bright today, but I know that the person I am right now is much more aware of the world than the person I was a decade ago. The person I will become over the next 120 months will likely look back on items written today and wonder how such nonsensical drivel could have been pushed out on a daily basis. A million monkeys using a million typewriters could pound out better prose than this single fool at a keyboard. But this is the point of the exercise. If I were to go back over the thousands of blog posts published to this site over the years and revise or remove items, then I am ultimately erasing one of the better resources I have to go back and see how my thinking has evolved over time as a result of new information and new experiences. So while I may not like some posts very much, I would rather keep them online2 than lose them entirely.

Would I consider rewriting the older posts, linking back to the original so that it would be easier to show what sort of cognitive evolution has taken place? It's certainly an option. If I were to write another blog post about Haruna Ai, Ikko, or trans-gendered people in general, it would likely be a better researched, academic-style thesis on the complexities people face when trying to fit into the binary Male/Female labels that many cultures and societies enforce. Why write about something that has nothing to do with me? The reasoning is really quite simple. By writing about a topic, I need to slow down and be more deliberate with my thinking.

Quite often it's when I am writing about a topic I don't know very much about that I learn the most.


  1. Wikipedia defines virtue signalling as a pejorative for the conspicuous expression of moral values. Academically, the phrase relates to signalling theory to describe a subset of social behaviours that could be used to signal virtue—especially piety among the religious.

  2. Yes, I know that I can password protect or otherwise hide posts on my blogging platform. This still doesn't guarantee that posts can't be surfaced through Google cache queries or on The Way Back machine. It's better to keep the posts open for anyone to see what a fool I was, and how I'm (hopefully) less foolish today.