RAM Emergency

How much memory does a typical computer need in 2019? When I look at machines that are sold at electronics shops1, I'm seeing machines that ship with between 4 and 8 GB of RAM. Looking at the Lenovo and Dell websites will show much of the same. Most of the notebooks that are handed out at the day job also fall into this category, with schools getting machines with 8GB, and managers getting units with 4GB2. When I moved out of the classroom in 2016 I was given a Lenovo W541 notebook with 8GB of RAM, which I promptly upgraded to 32 because it was the right thing to do. That machine has since been converted to a development server and I'm now using an X1 Carbon with 8GB. As I've lamented, perhaps too often, the sleek little notebook is great except for one little detail: 8GB is simply not enough.

RAM Emergency

As one would expect, I've brought this up with a couple of my managers who have all pretty much said the same thing: there isn't money in the budget right now for a new machine, so try to make due with what's at hand. I am certainly accustomed to working with what's on hand, though it generally means that I try to find creative solutions to my problems. The "fix" that I currently have is to offload work to other machines. I can send large workloads to the development server upstairs to chug through or, if I need even more power, a potent virtual machine with lots of memory and processing horsepower has been configured for me to use at the corporate data centre. This means potentially transferring up to 50 gigabytes of compressed data3 to get work done. It's suboptimal, but it's better than struggling with a machine that is simply not up to the task.

Today was pretty rough, though. More than once I noticed the machine struggling to keep up with the workload. If I were doing data transformations today then I could understand why the physical memory was exhausted and the swap file was being thrashed. However, today's tasks were all about working with web development tools. No database work. No API development or testing. Just design and development. Why couldn't the machine keep up?

The company had a RAM emergency. The office had too much RAM.
— Jen Barber, Relationship Manager for the IT Department of Reynholm Industries

Sometimes I'm tempted to bring up the issues that I face when using this notebook to carry out my duties. I didn't have these problems when I was permitted to use my own hardware, a MacBook Pro with 16GB RAM and a much slower SSD running the very same version of Ubuntu as the Lenovo. The previous system I had requested was denied as it came out to 338,700円, which is just over $3,000 USD. If I'm a little more conservative and choose a similar machine to what I have now, an X1 Carbon with 16GB RAM, less NVMe storage, and a higher resolution screen for 182,488円, which works out to just under $1,650 USD. The 2019-model X1 Carbons will be shipping in June, so the current version is priced to clear.

But am I asking too much?

For the longest time I have tried to cost the company less money than anyone in IT. This doesn't seem to be the case anymore. I work an excessive number of hours overtime and the hardware that I've managed to acquire over the last three years is not cheap. All of this is in the service of the day job, of course, but there is still a cost involved. The management has already said "no" to the request, so coming back at them for the third time in less than four months could appear to be selfish or persistent in the worst way.

While it's true that I could just "secretly" go back to using my own personal hardware to get the job done, I would be much more comfortable having sensitive, work-related data on a work-owned machine. This way, if I am terminated or decide to leave the company at some point in the future, then I'll know that there's no company data on any of my machines. Wiping a drive and re-installing an operating system isn't enough when it comes to keeping a device clear of data, as there are backups that could also contain data that does not belong to me. I treat this subject seriously as it's my responsibility to protect and maintain data not just for the day job, but for a number of people I offer services to. For this reason my machines will continue to be used for non-day job tasks. In the meantime, it will probably make the most sense to continue doing what I'm doing, working with the tools I have and finding ways to make it all work. When it comes time to discuss this year's performance with the management team, it may be possible to bring up the topic again.

Besides, I can always use the occasional system sluggishness as an excuse to get up and walk around; something I don't do nearly enough of anymore.


  1. Never buy a computer from an electronics shop unless it's an absolute emergency. You'll pay through the nose for something that's worth less than half of the amount you forked over. Buy online if at all possible.

  2. I don't understand the logic, either. Outlook alone will consume all of this just to start up, nevermind what the browser(s) and operating system want.

  3. I work with a lot of databases. Right now I've been tasked to perform a number of data migrations for corporate offices around the world.