Who Will Use SQL Server on Linux?

This past weekend I was having a discussion on IRC with someone about the role of SQL Server on Linux, and who might actually use the database engine over many of the more traditional, open alternatives like PostreSQL and MySQL. The argument essentially boiled down to this: my opponent said that "nobody in their right mind who wants to use SQL Server would migrate from Windows to Linux", and I said that "SQL Server on Linux isn't for people who already have systems built to use SQL Server installations on Windows, but for people who haven't even started their projects yet". Both of us are likely correct to a certain degree, and both of us are likely over-generalising by using terms like "everyone", "most", and "developers".

I've been using Microsoft's SQL Server on an Ubuntu Server installation since it was first made available this past summer, and I've got to admit that it's a solid little engine. SQL Server has long been my favourite database, and I tend to use others primarily because my servers are all Linux-based. MySQL is the go-to, but does it have to be for smaller projects?

I don't think so.

So with this in mind, I plan on proving to my weekend opponent that SQL Server on Linux is a viable solution by migrating 10Centuries from MariaDB 10.1 to SQL Server 2017. This won't be a simple drop-in replacement, as the two systems do things differently enough that it makes zero sense to hammer a square peg into a round hole. Instead, I plan on taking the examining system and designing a proper replacement that'll play to SQL Server's strengths and finally move all of the data rules from the API layer to the database, where it actually makes sense.

10Centuries is very much a relational system, and it should be perfectly reliable on SQL Server Web despite all the licensing limitations that Microsoft has in place for that edition of the engine. If there's any change at all, it will likely be that 10C is faster after the database change. There will certainly be some performance reports after the fact. If I can drop API response time down by 500ms without spending a small fortune on more hardware (or software licenses), I'll be very, very happy.

Umm ... Why?

A little over ten years ago I had an MCDBA certification from Microsoft that revolved around SQL Server 2005. Those skills are now well over a decade out of date, and I'd really like to get back into using this more powerful tool. By using SQL Server on Linux, I can gain experience with the system and also begin to understand the various things that the tool can and cannot do. I'm years away from becoming an expert, this should be a good first step down that road.

SQL Server can certainly be a great tool for people who prefer to use Linux and want to build or update their software. Just because it may not fit every use case doesn't mean it can't fill others.