Neighbourhood Vaccination Day

Last week a postcard arrived in the mail addressed to Nozomi, "care of" me. In big letters the document announced that it was time for everyone to have their dogs vaccinated for rabies, and that pop-up veterinary offices would be set up around the city to make the mandatory shots easier to receive. A schedule showed the nearby community centre would have a vet on hand for one hour today, and I booked some time off at the day job to make sure Nozomi would have her first-line of protection for another year.

A lot of cities in Japan require that non-human members of the family be registered with the local government and must be done so within two weeks of moving. The paperwork is a nuisance, but the city generally makes up for it by making an effort to ensure that every registered animal in the area has the basic set of shots every year at a discounted rate. Today's shot was priced at 3,400円1, which is about 100円 cheaper than one would pay at a vet. The discount is real, though not particularly compelling. What was compelling, however, was the proximity. The vet (mostly) came here, rather than us going there.

Background aside, Nozomi and I made our way to the community centre at 1:30. The weather was absolutely gorgeous and Nozomi was more than willing to trot along at a decent pace as we followed the pedestrian walk that winds through the neighbourhood. Along the way we met a dozen smaller dogs and a good many more larger dogs. It seemed that everyone who had a canine companion wanted to be first in line.

Fortunately there was little need to worry about lineups.

Typically when there are community pop-ups in Japan, I generally plan to stand around waiting for a minimum of half an hour or more. This wasn't the case today. As Nozomi and I walked up to the injection site a vet approached us and asked for the postcard. He asked a couple of questions, wrote some notes on the card, then asked me to sign it. Almost as soon as I was done writing my name a needle came out. The shot was over before Nozomi could even react with more than a quick head-turn.

Once done, I stood in line to pay for the service and pick up the requisite evidence that the little puppy was good for another year. All in all, the walk to the community centre took more time than anything. I'm not accustomed to this level of efficiency when the city is involved. Last spring when we registered her with the city the entire process took 45 minutes and involved writing her name, my name, our street address, the type of dog she is, and whether she's been fixed or not. Things that could really be done online rather than in person in a stuffy office with slow-moving bureaucrats.

As Nozomi took the injection rather well, we went for a bit of a walk to a different park afterwards so that she could enjoy some fresh air and sunshine. The older she gets the more relaxed she seems to become.


  1. 3,400円 works out to about $30.50 USD.