Billy Mitchell’s Donkey Kong high-score case will move forward to trial

(arstechnica.com)

A Los Angeles County judge has ruled that Billy Mitchell has met the "minimal merit" standard necessary to move forward to trial in his defamation case against the high-score adjudicators at the Twin Galaxies organization. But the ruling doesn't specifically weigh in on the conflicting evidence presented so far, and it suggests that both sides have some chance of prevailing at trial.

Mitchell says in court documents that Twin Galaxies' statement on the matter falsely and libelously implied that he was a cheater and that the organization's investigation ignored testimony from numerous eyewitnesses to his performance. Mitchell argues that Twin Galaxies' case "essentially rests on a conspiracy nearly as broad (and untenable) as the Kennedy assassination: Scores of people around the country with seemingly no connection to each other have agreed to lie and fabricate evidence that Mitchell achieved his records on arcade software."

C’mon people now, smile on your brother. Everybody get together. Gotta love one another right now.

Or, barring that, how about ten paces and turn? 🙄

Samsung, Stanford make a 10,000PPI display that could lead to 'flawless' VR

(www.engadget.com)

Ask VR fans about their gripes and they’ll likely mention the “screen door” effect, or the gaps between pixels that you notice when looking at a display so close to your eyes. That annoyance might disappear entirely if Samsung and Stanford University have their way. They’ve developed (via IEEE Spectrum) OLED technology that supports resolutions up to 10,000 pixels per inch — well above what you see in virtually any existing display, let alone what you’d find in a modern VR headset like the Oculus Quest 2.

10,000ppi would allow for 20K resolutions. If this technology can handle refresh rates as high as 120fps, then that would be 20,000x11,250 pixels, which works out to 225-million in total, by 120 … 27,000,000,000 pixels generated per second.

Okay, so that would be about … 4 of the new nVidea GTX 3090 cards with at least an i7 and 64GB RAM to coordinate them. A 3000-series AMD ThreadRipper would probably be better for it, though.

My goodness, that’s a lot of pixels to shove in someone’s face 🤐

Man with 8 lifetime driving bans caught speeding in Ontario

(driving.ca)

Police pulled over a man near Orangeville, Ontario for speeding October 20, but when officers checked his licence, they found the infraction was not his first, nor worst, offence.

Yes, 60-year-old Timothy Fraser of Toronto had been previously issued eight separate lifetime driving bans. Yes, eight. Either this guy is some sort of ageless vampire who’s already served those lifetime bans consecutively, or, perhaps slightly more plausibly, he just doesn’t care about the cops.

🙄

'I’m alive': Jordan Peterson back in Canada after lengthy medical treatment, he says in emotional new video

(nationalpost.com)

Jordan Peterson, the Canadian psychology professor who skyrocketed to fame before vanishing from the public eye for nearly a year, has posted an emotional new video online, explaining that he’s back home in Toronto after months seeking medical treatment for withdrawal symptoms related to benzodiazepine use.

“Hopefully, much of that is behind me and I can return to something resembling a normal life,” said Peterson. […] “I hope that what I produce in the future will, that people will find it, of equal or greater utility. That’s an ambitious hope … but it still seems appropriate, an appropriate goal for my upcoming activities,” he said.

This is good news. I’m really glad that he’s able to carry on. Hopefully there will be less interference from the media and haters.

Can Evernote make a comeback?

(www.engadget.com)

Evernote used to be the king of note-taking apps. The obvious go-to, regardless of the hardware you owned and what you were trying to store. […] That popularity allowed the company to expand into new areas. It partnered with Moleskine to produce paper notebooks which, through a combination of stickers and scanning, could be easily tagged and ported into Evernote. It launched a food-specific app and offered a whole range of merchandise including desk tidies and socks.

But those days are long gone.

Evernote has been retooling their system for just over two years. A lot of things have changed for the better. Some things, like the API interfaces, have remained the same. I’ve found the system to be a lot easier to approach after years of waffling between different note-taking apps.

Hopefully Evernote can find some success with their recent releases 👍🏻

Surface Duo review—Orphaned Windows hardware makes a poor Android device

(arstechnica.com)

The Good

  • It's pretty. The flat glass and ultra-thin profile makes for a compelling ultra-premium looking design.

The Bad

  • The lack of a split keyboard means you're stuck with one-finger typing in the standard "book" configuration. You have to swap to single-screen mode to get two fingers on the keyboard.

  • The phone is extraordinarily wide for no reason. Android apps don't do well on wide screens, so you either get a huge UI or giant margins. The width means the phone doesn't fit well in a pocket and is hard to hold.

  • The whole notification experience is terrible, with a skinny notification panel and no way to see notifications when the phone is closed.

  • There's no NFC.

  • There's no wireless charging.

  • There's no water resistance.

  • There's no high refresh rate display.

  • Microsoft is shipping last year's SoC.

  • You will probably break the USB port.

  • The software is very buggy, and you should expect to regularly fight with wonky gestures, a wonky touchscreen, and lots of problems that will need a reboot or at least closing and opening the phone again.

  • The $1400 price tag.

The Ugly

  • Microsoft's "We would really like to ship this existing hardware" mentality ruined all the hype around its entrance into the Android ecosystem.

This reads like something put out by my employer, not a company with the resources of Microsoft … 😑

Raymond J. de Souza: We can finally admit that plastic recycling has been a sham all along

(nationalpost.com)

After generations of governments at all levels promoting recycling with salvific zeal, we now have the confession: recycling of plastics has mostly been a crock. Those who wished to know knew long ago. I did, but then we economists tend to be the sort who — what’s the phrase? — follow the science. We are not dumbfounded if there are unintended consequences when government regulation mandates that rubbish has resale value.

This has long been known. In Japan it’s about 40% of plastics that get recycled. The rest is generally incinerated 🙄

Wooden toy boat washes ashore on Lake Superior after 27 years adrift

(nationalpost.com)

On Oct. 7, a small wooden boat drifted ashore on Lake Superior, leaving locals with a puzzling mystery. The Apostle Islands National Seashore in Wisconsin, a U.S. National Parks service, said the red, white, and blue boat was found with a message inscribed on its hull.

“I am traveling to the ocean. Please put me back in the water. Will you send information on your whereabouts to, Lakewood School, Room 116 & 118 5207 N. Tischer Duluth, MN 53304,” read the tiny vessel.

Yeah, it’s a fluff piece, but it’s a nice one 🙂

French museum pulls Genghis Khan exhibition after China objects to name 'Genghis Khan'

(nationalpost.com)

A museum in France has delayed its Genghis Khan exhibition after an attempt by the Chinese Government to censor certain words and materials surrounding the showcase. […]

But the history museum, Château des ducs de Bretagne in Nantes, pushed back when Chinese authorities called for certain words, including “Genghis Khan,” “empire” and “Mongol,” to be removed from the exhibition, Agence France-Presse reports. Chinese authorities later asked for control over exhibition brochures, legends and maps, the museum said.

This is a bridge too far for many. China will need to step up their conquest of western institutions if they plan on rewriting history to this degree.

Bruce Pardy: In universities, the revolution is now complete

(nationalpost.com)

I teach at Queen’s University’s law school, housed in Sir John A. Macdonald Hall, named after Canada’s first prime minister. On Sept. 18, our faculty board, consisting of professors, students, administrators and staff, voted 29 to three to remove Macdonald’s name from the building. The vote, which also included five abstentions, is not binding upon the university’s board of trustees, which has the jurisdiction to make the call. Queen’s principal, Patrick Deane, is expected to make a recommendation to the board this week, and it will vote on the question soon after. Macdonald is likely to become another casualty of the cultural revolution currently underway in Canada.

At universities, that revolution is all but complete. Who controls the present controls the past, Orwell tells us, and who controls the past controls the future. Although Queen’s will cancel Macdonald, purportedly on the grounds that he was a racist white man, his demise has little to do with the man himself and everything to do with what he has come to represent. One of the tasks of any revolution is to tear down the narratives upon which the previous order was built. Macdonald himself is less important than how we regard him. When any historical figure is cancelled, the real targets are the attitudes of the living.

This opinion piece pretty much outlines why Canada isn’t the same country I grew up in. I cannot live in a populated part of that country ever again … 🙄